Old FIRST Awards

magnets award will pay up to $300,000 in direct costs–plus F&A–for 5 years, making it much larger over all than the old FIRST awards–and larger, in fact, than the average R01.

The downside? NIH estimates that Neodymium 14-16 awards will be made. For comparison, samarium cobalt magnets year NIH awarded more than 1400 R01s to strong Neodymium magnets investigators. Chances are, this program will be flooded with applications so success rates probably will be very low. As long as the number of awards remains this small, an R01 application is probably the way to go, even for strong Neodymium magnets investigators.

Update: NIH has the funding announcement posted. See GrantsNet or the NIH site for more details.

– Posted by Jim Austin

Permalink | Comments Tags: funding, NIH

9 MARCH 2007

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Resolved: Work-Life Synergy (A Note from a Reader/Bagpiper)

Dear Editor,

I just discovered the “Mind Matters” articles on sciencemag.org and wish to congratulate you on a job well done. I particularly enjoyed the articles on balancing science and other activities.

I am a graduate student at the University of Pittsburgh in the chemistry department, and from the start I made a commitment to maintain my other passion, playing bagpipes. I make sure to spend at least two hours a day practicing. I have also been fortunate enough to maintain a commitment to several ensembles during my time at Pitt. In every case, my advisor has been very supportive of this decision, even allowing a few days off for performances and other activities. I have found that working on my playing just as hard as I work on my research creates a necessary synergy in which each activity supports the other.

I look forward to more great Mind Matters articles in the future.

Albert DeFusco

– Posted by Jim Austin

Permalink | Comments Tags: Feedback, Mind Matters, work-life balance

8 MARCH 2007
“Opportunities” and Making an Impact

I recently interviewed Dennis Gillings, the founder of Quintiles Transnational, a contract pharmaceutical-services firm that now employs 16,000 people in 50-plus countries on six continents. Gillings just pledged $50 million to the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina (UNC), where he was a faculty member before starting Quintiles. The idea behind his gift was to increase “innovation” at the school of public health and in public-health research generally. Gillings wants to stimulate research that doesn’t stop at clever inventions. Gillings aims to help the school create comprehensive solutions to public-health problems, including the necessary inventions Magnetic toys also methods for their implementation.

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